Artist | EUBENA NAMPITJIN (dec)


Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by EUBENA NAMPITJIN of Warlayirti Artists (Balgo). The title is Kinyu. [299/08] (Acrylic on Linen)

EUBENA NAMPITJIN (dec)

Kinyu

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by EUBENA NAMPITJIN of Warlayirti Artists (Balgo). The title is Kinyu. [310/08] (Acrylic on Linen)

EUBENA NAMPITJIN (dec)

Kinyu

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by EUBENA NAMPITJIN of Warlayirti Artists (Balgo). The title is Kinyu. [230/11] (Acrylic on Linen)

EUBENA NAMPITJIN (dec)

Kinyu

Eubena (Yupinya) is the best known of Warlayirti Artists’ many artists.

She is one of the most esteemed Law women in the community, being consulted and deferred to on all questions of Law.

Mukaka, Eubena’s mother, together with her uncle, gave her Maparn (traditional healer) skills when Eubena was just a young girl.

In her formative years Eubena and her family travelled and hunted, performing ceremonies and Law to look after their country in the Great Sandy Desert, as well as for their own spiritual preservation.

Nomadic life was harsh and most of her extended family had passed away or moved to other parts of the country by the time Eubena had her first contact with non-Aboriginal people.

Eubena with her first husband, the late Gimme, and family travelled up the Canning Stock Route to Billiluna Station before following the mission as it moved around, until the mission was established at its present site at Balgo.

At the mission Eubena and Gimme helped Father Piele with a Kukatja dictionary.

Today Eubena is one of the few people who maintains a full vocabulary of the Kukatja language.

Despite living at the mission and tending herds of goats, Eubena continually travelled back to her country, living in and from the land for extended periods.

Her extraordinary hunting instinct, which remains today, combines with an effortless energy when she is out in the country.

Eubena started painting with her second husband Wimmitji in the mid 1980s.

Their work shared a luminous and intricate complexity along with a love of the warm reds, oranges and yellows that continue to be Eubena’s signature today.

Eubena’s reputation grew, as one half of the famous painting duo at Balgo, but also as a solo artist in her own right.

Eubena has a spontaneity and strength of brush mark that carves the paint, leaving rhythmical tracks across the canvas.

Her work resonates with the power of place and intimate knowledge of country that Eubena has been able to maintain throughout her life.

Painting is like her second language and she paints persistently with passion and dedication, weaving stories from the Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) as well as her personal history and knowledge.

Eubena has travelled extensively to attend exhibition openings around the country and her work has been collected by every major collection around the world, including our very own Singapore Art Museum (SAM).

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Eubena (Yupinya) is the best known of Warlayirti Artists’ many artists.

She is one of the most esteemed Law women in the community, being consulted and deferred to on all questions of Law.

Mukaka, Eubena’s mother, together with her uncle, gave her Maparn (traditional healer) skills when Eubena was just a young girl.

In her formative years Eubena and her family travelled and hunted, performing ceremonies and Law to look after their country in the Great Sandy Desert, as well as for their own spiritual preservation.

Nomadic life was harsh and most of her extended family had passed away or moved to other parts of the country by the time Eubena had her first contact with non-Aboriginal people.

Eubena with her first husband, the late Gimme, and family travelled up the Canning Stock Route to Billiluna Station before following the mission as it moved around, until the mission was established at its present site at Balgo.

At the mission Eubena and Gimme helped Father Piele with a Kukatja dictionary.

Today Eubena is one of the few people who maintains a full vocabulary of the Kukatja language.

Despite living at the mission and tending herds of goats, Eubena continually travelled back to her country, living in and from the land for extended periods.

Her extraordinary hunting instinct, which remains today, combines with an effortless energy when she is out in the country.

Eubena started painting with her second husband Wimmitji in the mid 1980s.

Their work shared a luminous and intricate complexity along with a love of the warm reds, oranges and yellows that continue to be Eubena’s signature today.

Eubena’s reputation grew, as one half of the famous painting duo at Balgo, but also as a solo artist in her own right.

Eubena has a spontaneity and strength of brush mark that carves the paint, leaving rhythmical tracks across the canvas.

Her work resonates with the power of place and intimate knowledge of country that Eubena has been able to maintain throughout her life.

Painting is like her second language and she paints persistently with passion and dedication, weaving stories from the Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) as well as her personal history and knowledge.

Eubena has travelled extensively to attend exhibition openings around the country and her work has been collected by every major collection around the world, including our very own Singapore Art Museum (SAM).

.



Exhibitions that EUBENA NAMPITJIN (dec) has exhibited at

Imelda and Family (Additional Works)

A Collection of Fine Warlayirti Indigenous Art


Stock Room Show - 2012 (Part 1)

A Collection of Contemporary Modern Aboriginal Art


BALGO - 2011

A Collection of Fine Warlayirti Artists Art


Kinti kinti, Purrka purrka – The Balgo Way

A Collection of Fine Warlayirti Artists Art