Artist | LINDSAY HARRIS

Artist | LINDSAY HARRIS


Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by LINDSAY HARRIS of Miscellaneous Artists. The title is Ngaarngk-Daaberting (Sun setting over Coaring Rock) - 2009/10. [n/a] (Resin & Pigment on Hemp)

LINDSAY HARRIS

Ngaarngk-Daaberting (Sun setting over Coaring Rock) - 2…

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by LINDSAY HARRIS of Miscellaneous Artists. The title is Jilbaa (Springtime). [19 - Jilbaa (Springtime)] (Pigment, Resin, Binder and Clay on Hemp)

LINDSAY HARRIS

Jilbaa (Springtime)

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by LINDSAY HARRIS of Miscellaneous Artists. The title is Djen daaragar (White tracks/footprints). [20 - Djen daaragar (White tracks/footprints)] (Pigment, Resin, Binder and Clay on Hemp)

LINDSAY HARRIS

Djen daaragar (White tracks/footprints)

The focus of my art is the inscribed landscapes of Kwolyin and surrounding areas.

This area I consider to be my country and it is the influence of and continuing memories of Kwolyin that are depicted in all my paintings. Kwolyin town is now a ghost town with only a church remaining.

However, when I am there, I can make out the barest foundations of its town-site.

Impermanence is the word that best describes what I am seeing.

Impermanence is one of the key themes in my artistic orientations.

Change is always occurring nothing stays the same.

Travelling through Kwolyin, a person would only observe the church and the road going through the town-site and would think that was all there is.

But there are memories.

These memories inspire my artwork.

Unlike the traveller or stranger in this space, I see the landscape as it was and this is the very same space I come to represent in the present.

Granite rocks, lakes, trees and sites are signifiers of my past.

The granite rock formations depicted in these paintings elicit joyful memories of a childhood spent playing on these outcrops.

The siding train tracks meandering across some of my works were the lifeblood of the Kwolyin community but nowadays are but a distant memory of the past. My work gives people insights into my country and the connections to the old stories in this modern day.

The outcome is really about telling the stories of my country.

My art brings a sense of intimacy and connection to my boodja (my land).

Through my paintings I invite people to go on a journey back to my land and see and understand it as I see it and perhaps how my ancestors once saw it.

My main endeavour with my current practice is to help people make sense of the aesthetics of my land through utilising the natural materials such as resins, ochres and pipe clay that are resonant of my boodja (my land). My paintings come from physical and spiritual nourishment created from having an intimacy when in my country.

This is possibly why an explanation to the viewer is necessary about my art as it is difficult to fully appreciate the meaning if one has not been there and breathed and rested in these lands as I have..



The focus of my art is the inscribed landscapes of Kwolyin and surrounding areas.

This area I consider to be my country and it is the influence of and continuing memories of Kwolyin that are depicted in all my paintings. Kwolyin town is now a ghost town with only a church remaining.

However, when I am there, I can make out the barest foundations of its town-site.

Impermanence is the word that best describes what I am seeing.

Impermanence is one of the key themes in my artistic orientations.

Change is always occurring nothing stays the same.

Travelling through Kwolyin, a person would only observe the church and the road going through the town-site and would think that was all there is.

But there are memories.

These memories inspire my artwork.

Unlike the traveller or stranger in this space, I see the landscape as it was and this is the very same space I come to represent in the present.

Granite rocks, lakes, trees and sites are signifiers of my past.

The granite rock formations depicted in these paintings elicit joyful memories of a childhood spent playing on these outcrops.

The siding train tracks meandering across some of my works were the lifeblood of the Kwolyin community but nowadays are but a distant memory of the past. My work gives people insights into my country and the connections to the old stories in this modern day.

The outcome is really about telling the stories of my country.

My art brings a sense of intimacy and connection to my boodja (my land).

Through my paintings I invite people to go on a journey back to my land and see and understand it as I see it and perhaps how my ancestors once saw it.

My main endeavour with my current practice is to help people make sense of the aesthetics of my land through utilising the natural materials such as resins, ochres and pipe clay that are resonant of my boodja (my land). My paintings come from physical and spiritual nourishment created from having an intimacy when in my country.

This is possibly why an explanation to the viewer is necessary about my art as it is difficult to fully appreciate the meaning if one has not been there and breathed and rested in these lands as I have..



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