Artist | MICK JAWALJI

Artist | MICK JAWALJI


Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by MICK JAWALJI of Warmun Artists. The title is Dabanjuwa. [WAC769/04] (Natural Ochre and Pigments on Plywood)

MICK JAWALJI

Dabanjuwa

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by MICK JAWALJI of Warmun Artists. The title is Guljarrina. [WAC507/08] (Natural Ochre and Pigments on Plywood)

MICK JAWALJI

Guljarrina

Australian Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) artwork by MICK JAWALJI of Warmun Artists. The title is Gurlungen. [WAC510/08] (Natural Ochre and Pigments on Plywood)

MICK JAWALJI

Gurlungen

Mick Jawalji was born at Yulumbu, in western Gija country, around 1920, just before the establishment of Tableland cattle station. Yulumbu is the Gija name for the place where the Tableland Station airstrip lies. Jawalji is the senior traditional owner of the Bang.gurr region of western Gija country. Bang.gurr is the name of the huge flat-topped hill on the way to the Tableland homestead known as Black Person Hill in English. Jawalji's father was one of the main workers who built the Tableland station homestead.

Jawalji grew up on Yulumbu and learnt stockwork. Like most old Indigenous people in the Kimberley, he worked with cattle, mustering and droving. As well as being head stockman, he was a renowned horsebreaker. Jawalji and his stockmen drove cattle from Tableland to the Glenroy meatworks and as far away as Derby and Wyndham. While he was living and working in his country, Jawalji learnt about all the places in that country. He learnt the stories of these places and the meanings of the rock paintings found there. Each wet season he and his people would meet to practise law, sometimes walking as far as Mt House Station. This helped maintain their country and culture. Jawalji also spent a number of years working on Mornington, a station west of Yulumbu. He lived with the Andayin people and learnt much Andayin law and culture from his stepfather and mother. Jawalji speaks for Andayin country, now that the traditional owner has passed away. As well as Tableland and Mornington Stations, Jawalji worked at Fossil Downs, Brooking Springs, Mabel Downs and Lansdowne Stations. Since retiring, Jawalji has lived in a number of communities. He now lives in Imintji community, on the Gibb River Road, 220km east of Derby.

He started painting on canvas in about 2001, at first on cardboard, and has experimented with both ochre and acrylic on board and canvas. He joined the other Gija Warmun artists in 2002 continuing to paint his boards in Imintji but paying frequent visits to Warmun, where he has family. Gallery owners and art collectors quickly recognised the value of the paintings of this strong law man and his boards are in high demand. Jawalji's paintings feature places in his Bang.gurr country and Dreamtime stories from those places. He continues to live in Western Gija country with his offsider Barney YU, who also lives at Imintji. He is an acclaimed painter and paints under his Aboriginal name, Ngara.



Mick Jawalji was born at Yulumbu, in western Gija country, around 1920, just before the establishment of Tableland cattle station. Yulumbu is the Gija name for the place where the Tableland Station airstrip lies. Jawalji is the senior traditional owner of the Bang.gurr region of western Gija country. Bang.gurr is the name of the huge flat-topped hill on the way to the Tableland homestead known as Black Person Hill in English. Jawalji's father was one of the main workers who built the Tableland station homestead.

Jawalji grew up on Yulumbu and learnt stockwork. Like most old Indigenous people in the Kimberley, he worked with cattle, mustering and droving. As well as being head stockman, he was a renowned horsebreaker. Jawalji and his stockmen drove cattle from Tableland to the Glenroy meatworks and as far away as Derby and Wyndham. While he was living and working in his country, Jawalji learnt about all the places in that country. He learnt the stories of these places and the meanings of the rock paintings found there. Each wet season he and his people would meet to practise law, sometimes walking as far as Mt House Station. This helped maintain their country and culture. Jawalji also spent a number of years working on Mornington, a station west of Yulumbu. He lived with the Andayin people and learnt much Andayin law and culture from his stepfather and mother. Jawalji speaks for Andayin country, now that the traditional owner has passed away. As well as Tableland and Mornington Stations, Jawalji worked at Fossil Downs, Brooking Springs, Mabel Downs and Lansdowne Stations. Since retiring, Jawalji has lived in a number of communities. He now lives in Imintji community, on the Gibb River Road, 220km east of Derby.

He started painting on canvas in about 2001, at first on cardboard, and has experimented with both ochre and acrylic on board and canvas. He joined the other Gija Warmun artists in 2002 continuing to paint his boards in Imintji but paying frequent visits to Warmun, where he has family. Gallery owners and art collectors quickly recognised the value of the paintings of this strong law man and his boards are in high demand. Jawalji's paintings feature places in his Bang.gurr country and Dreamtime stories from those places. He continues to live in Western Gija country with his offsider Barney YU, who also lives at Imintji. He is an acclaimed painter and paints under his Aboriginal name, Ngara.



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